Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

LIS 1001 Fall 2014: Plagiarism

For use with the classes taught by Librarians

What is plagiarism?

CITING YOUR SOURCES

                 

Plagiarism is presenting the words or ideas of someone else as your own without proper acknowledgment of the source.

The research skills you are developing will enable you to effectively locate and evaluate relevant information. However, you need to remember to give credit for the information you use in your assignments. When you forget to cite your sources, you are guilty of plagiarism.

It is plagiarism when you:

  • use the words or ideas of another person without citing that person
  • When you work on a research paper you will probably find supporting material for your paper from works by others
  •  It's okay to use the ideas of other people, but you do need to credit them correctly.When you quote people—or even when you summarize or paraphrase information found in books, articles, Web pages, or other information sources you must acknowledge the original author by providing a citation for the source.
  • Buy or use a term paper written by someone else paraphrase a person's words without citing that person cut & paste passages, and insert them into your paper without citing a source.

Cyber Cheating

 

 What is Cybercheating? (Hint: It's another form of Plagiarism)

 

 

  • Cutting and pasting someone else's web publication and submitting it as your own.
  • Downloading essays, papers, speeches etc. from the web and turning them in as your own.
  • Buying essays, papers, speeches etc. via the web and turning them in as your own. 

Cite Sources

 

                                                                                                 

 

                                                                                       

Avoid Plagiarism

Five Tips for Avoiding Plagiarism

 

  

1.  First, use your own ideas. It should be your paper and your ideas that should be the focus. Use the ideas of others sparingly—only to support or reinforce your own argument.

2.  When taking notes or copying information from online databases, the Web, magazines, books, etc., include a complete citation for each item you use as a source of information.

 3  .When taking notes or copying information from online databases, the Web, magazines, books, etc.,include a complete citation for each item you use as a source of information. 

4. Use quotation marks when directly stating another person's words.

5. A good strategy is to take 30 minutes and write a short draft of your paper without using any notes. It will help you think through what you want to say and help prevent your being too dependent upon your sources.

 

Quoting and Paraphrasing

Quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing are three methods that allow you to ethically incorporate another author's writing into your research, as long as you cite your sources accurately.

Remember these guidelines...

Quotations must match the source word for word.

They must be attributed to the original author.

Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words.

A paraphrase must be attributed to the original source.

 Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s).

Summarized ideas must be attributed to the original source.

You must cite someone else's:

  •  Data
  • Graph
  •  Photograph
  • Drawing
  • Table of information
  • Experiment
  •  Example
  • Speech
  • Video source (film, TV program)
  •  Structure of sequencing of facts, ideas or arguments Idea (interpretation, opinion, conclusion)

You do not have to cite your own Words you quote, summarize or paraphrase Idea (interpretation, opinion, conclusion)

  • Idea (interpretation, opinion, conclusion)
  • Data
  • Graph
  • Photograph
  • Drawing
  • Table of information
  • Experiment
  • Example
  • Unique concept
  • Apt phrase
  • Expression of common knowledge
  • Solution to a problem