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LIS 1001 Fall 2014: Annotated Bibliography

For use with the classes taught by Librarians

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

 

 

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents.

  • Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph: the annotation.
  • The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited.
  •  Annotations vs. Abstracts: The Difference Abstracts are purely descriptive summaries often found at the beginning of scholarly journal articles or in periodical indexes.
  • Annotations are descriptive and critical. They expose the author's point of view, clarity and appropriateness of expression, and authority.
  • Elements of an Annotated Bibliography Citation The single entry of basic information about a research resource.
  • Each citation should include Author Title Place of publication Publisher Copyright date And if the source requires Volume number Date Publication Pages Electronic sources, etc.

Elements of an Annotated Bibliography

 

Citation:

 The single entry of basic information about a research resource

Each citation should include

  • Author
  • Title
  • Place of publication
  • Publisher
  • Copyright date

And if the source requires

  • Volume number
  • Date
  • Publication
  • Pages
  • Electronic sources, etc. 

Bibliography:  

A list of writings focused on a topic, presented in an organized fashion with each entry showing a citation.

Most bibliographies show the list of materials in alphabetical order by the first word of the entry-usually author, but by title when there is no author.

An author can also be an institution or an Association (e.g., American Psychological Association or Amnesty International).

 

 

Annotation:

A critique or analysis of the information resources (books, magazines, articles, newspapers, etc.) used to study a topic.

A critique or analysis of the information resources (books, magazines, articles, newspapers, etc.) used to study a topic.

The annotation shows in what ways the work was helpful to the study of the subject and in what ways it was not.

 

Creating an Annotated Bibliography

 

To create an annotated bibliography you must:

  • Locate citations to books, periodicals, and documents that may contain useful information and ideas on your topic.
  • Review the actual items, choosing works providing a variety of perspectives on your topic
  • Cite each book, article, or document using the appropriate MLA or APA Format.
  • Write a concise annotation following each bibliographic citation.

The annotation should:

  • provide full bibliographic information;
  • describe the item's contents, significant attachments and special features;
  • indicate scope, treatment, authority, and point of view;
  • indicate quality;
  • discuss the suitability of the source for its intended audience;
  • point out the merits and deficiencies in treatment and presentation of the subject matter.
  • possibly compare the item with other sources on the same subject.

Rules for Preparing Annotations

 

 

Rules for Writing Annotations

.  Use the active voice; e.g., "The dog bit the boy" rather than "The boy was bitten by the dog."

.  Be brief. Avoid unnecessary words and long involved sentences: annotations contain only the essential information about a source and should not              be longer than 50 -150 words.

Be specific. Beware of generalizations; e.g., "The book is based on research." Avoid adjectives such as "excellent" or "good." Try not to begin each       annotation with "This book" or "This article."

Evaluate and analyze the material. Do not summarize. Writing Style: Point of View Write from the point of view of an objective third person. Most essay       writing is usually written from the first-person point of view, using pronouns such as I or we, or the third-person point of view, using pronouns such as       he, she, they, or one.

The third-person point of view is also known as the third-person objective point of view. Learning this technique adds a sophisticated tool to the        repertoire of a masterful writer.

 .  Like all skills, one must practice the technique to master the skill. Use 3rd Person Pronouns he, she, it, they him, her, it them his, her, hers, it their,          theirs.

.     All Indefinite Pronouns Are Third Person another anybody anyone anything both each either everybody everyone many everything neither nobody no          one few one somebody someone several.  

.    Writing Style: Signal Verbs Use Introduction or Signal Verbs to Write Annotations •"John Doe says" is one way to introduce a quote. However, using it         repetitively weakens your writing Signal verbs show your understanding of the author's purpose and allow you to evaluate her or his effectiveness in         accomplishing that purpose.

 

Reproduced with permission from: Healey Library | UMass Boston