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Career Resources: MLA, APA, & Plagiarism

Style Manuals
Writing Resources

Styles


 


Developing a Thesis Statement

An effective thesis cannot be answered with a simple "yes" or "no." A thesis is not a topic; nor is it a fact; nor is it an opinion. "Reasons for the fall of communism" is a topic. "Communism collapsed in Eastern Europe" is a fact known by educated people. "The fall of communism is the best thing that ever happened in Europe" is an opinion. (Superlatives like "the best" almost always lead to trouble. It's impossible to weigh every "thing" that ever happened in Europe. And what about the fall of Hitler? Couldn't that be "the best thing"?)

A good thesis has two parts. It should tell what you plan to argue, and it should "telegraph" how you plan to argue—that is, what particular support for your claim is going where in your essay.

From Harvard College Writing Center, Developing a Thesis

Purdue OWL: Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement


Citations

Plagiarism

 


A General Guide to Understanding Written Plagiarism


Plagiarism