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Mental Health Information

This guide provides information to assist users find mental health resources to become aware of and to make choices toward a fulfilling life. This LibGuide is for informational purposes only.

Depressive Disorders

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Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, concentration, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks (National Institute of Mental Health).

For more information, please see: Bipolar Disorder

 

Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. For some individuals, major depression can result in severe impairments that interfere with or limit one’s ability to carry out major life activities (National Institute of Mental Health).

For more information, please see: Major Depression

 

Perinatal depression is depression that occurs during or after pregnancy. The symptoms can range from mild to severe. In rare cases, the symptoms are severe enough that the health of the mother and baby may be at risk (National Institute of Mental Health).

For more information, please see: Peripartum (Postpartum) Depression

 

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a much more severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It may affect women of childbearing age. It’s a severe and chronic medical condition that needs attention and treatment (Johns Hopkins Medicine).

For more information, please see: Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)

 

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that's related to changes in seasons.  SAD begins and ends at about the same time every year. If you're like most people with SAD, your symptoms start in the fall and continue into the winter months, sapping your energy and making you feel moody (Mayo Clinic).

For more information, please see: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)